The Magic of Water

Aside from the health benefits of drinking good pure water daily, this elixir of life has incredible power when it comes to pagans and in the human experience.

Water is a universal cleaner, the fluid of life and the largest component in the human body. We are over ninety percent water and our bodies respond faster to dehydration than any other natural condition. We must take in fluids to be healthy. Water is the best there is.

Oceans and other bodies of water provide a home for the teeming forms of life in each, both plant and animal. These bodies of water contain all tat is needed for the multitudinous creatures to survive.

In the practice of magic, water provides the fluid as a conduit, symbolizing not only blood, but the fluid of the womb, rebirthing and replenishing what has been depleted. The element of water washes away the old and refreshes the new…ushering in the cleanliness and clarity of this moment.

The flow of a moving stream shows another aspect to water. Moving water is power in another way. The movement of it generates a constant rebirth and so renewal for stones and other magical tools is done well when the item is immersed in moving / running water.

Hydromancy is the art of scrying in a dish of water, from an ancient tradition practiced (in recorded history) in both ancient Greece and Rome, but with traditions back much much farther than that. Water scrying appears in literature like the story of Arthur and Gwenevere. The Avalon priestesses scry in a holy well up on the Tor.

Today, many pagans and seers use a black or dark ceramic or glass dish. Pure spring water works the best. The Greeks believed that spirits lived in the water and could control it.

Water is a necessary liquid of life and spirit, body and soul. It is the Great Fluid

 

© J Thompson

The Third Eye – Peacock Feathers

Peacock Feathers, Pavo Cristatus, Native to India
Peacock Feathers / Third Eye

Peacock feathers have long been associated with protection, most especially of the inner psyche, the Third Eye.  It’s beautiful pattern appears as an eye, fueling the legends of old.

The peacock “eye” in some cultures was thought to represent the evil eye and considered unlucky.

The bird, because of its vivid hues and royal attitude, is held up as a symbol to manifesting wealth in our lives and it was this royal attitude that had monarchs keep peacocks on the grounds for state occasions.

From Greek myth to Christianity, the “eyes” of the peacock represent celestial bodies, the field of eyes being the stars.  In ancient Babylon, they stood on throne and throne-room as guardians to royalty.

Many incredible facts about peacocks

Born With A Caul

Once in a while, a baby is born with a caul, or veil on its head or encased in it.  This is a natural membrane, but has folklore an beliefs attached to the occurrence. My own great uncle was born with a caul and spent his nearly ninety years telling of this feeling or that and usually right.

Many believe that the child in the caul will have unusually strong powers of psychic abilit and be naturally empathic by nature.  The caul, or veil, is supposed to keep contained, the energy and memories of previous existence and ability.  Most babies born without the caul are said to have lost those memories and abilities during the birth process and regain them sometimes, in their lives.

During the centuries of the middle ages, a caul bearer was seen as a very good sign of luck. Villages felt blessed to have a bearer among them and often looked for indications from the bearer about crops, and markets, etc. 

A caul was gathered with clean unbleached cotton cloth, dried in the sun and wrapped up for the mother to keep. Many mothers sold their baby’s caul to sailors as it was considered a charm to ward off drowning. 

In the Victorian era, a small bit was tucked into a hair locket or petite pointe embroidery and carried as a momentum, especially if the child succumbed in child birth in a time when the infant mortality rate was so high.


© J.J. Thompson